Author Topic: Books versus Life  (Read 2712 times)

Offline NekoJonez

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Books versus Life
« on: January 06, 2013, 01:16:35 PM »
Alright, this debate is one I did with Pow a long while ago. But I actually think it's a quite interesting topic to talk about.

The issue is that Pow, who studies psychology, talked about autism in the way how the books in the college told him. Which are the result of years of study.

But, I, as somebody with autism, was told these things by Pow and thought things like "But this is so general. Or so incomplete."

So, our conclusion was that no party is wrong OR right. The books are generalized over a lot of people with autism and my witness is just a few people and myself.

But what do you guys think? Are the symptoms in the psychology books accurate? Or do they make the upcoming doctors and shrinks having too general views of a mental "illness"? (Let's talk about ALL sorts of mental "illnesses", (quotes since I think it's not insulting then.))

Offline Kiss x Miz

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Re: Books versus Life
« Reply #1 on: January 06, 2013, 01:42:23 PM »
Alright, this debate is one I did with Pow a long while ago. But I actually think it's a quite interesting topic to talk about.

The issue is that Pow, who studies psychology, talked about autism in the way how the books in the college told him. Which are the result of years of study.

But, I, as somebody with autism, was told these things by Pow and thought things like "But this is so general. Or so incomplete."

So, our conclusion was that no party is wrong OR right. The books are generalized over a lot of people with autism and my witness is just a few people and myself.

But what do you guys think? Are the symptoms in the psychology books accurate? Or do they make the upcoming doctors and shrinks having too general views of a mental "illness"? (Let's talk about ALL sorts of mental "illnesses", (quotes since I think it's not insulting then.))
My mom is an expert on autism. She says lots of those books just contain too much nonsense among the facts. There is no guarantee an autistic person will have all the specific traits either. The only way to understand mental illnesses is by experiencing them firsthand. You won't learn enough from books alone.

Offline BloodcatNS

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Re: Books versus Life
« Reply #2 on: January 06, 2013, 02:21:35 PM »
Uhh... what exactly did the books say in the first place? I can't debate if I don't have info. >.>

The title's also too general. :P

Offline Mr.PowPow

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Re: Books versus Life
« Reply #3 on: January 06, 2013, 09:57:41 PM »
I can't remember what the textbooks said exactly, this debate happened a while ago and it wasn't compulsory to my education, I took it out of my personal time to read these textbooks. Most likely why I can't remember.

However the general point is that I was trying to make is that what is written in books also connects to real life accounts because the research is based off encounters with those who have autism (normally its more than one encounter otherwise it isn't accepted by the British  Psychology board, deeming it unrepresentative). Though not all cases of autism are the same, and there is an aspect of generalization within  the psychology research, it can still be applied to those who suffer as although not all autistic people show exactly the same symptoms, they still obviously share traits. Thus treatment of said autism can be carried across to various sufferers.

^ this all stemmed from my comment that the effect Autism has on an individual can be lessened by cognitive therapy (not cured, just think of  it as a coping mechanism). During the conversation with Jonez, the type of cognitive therapy that I had in mind was the negative thought cycle therapy (it has another name, but I forget).
« Last Edit: January 06, 2013, 10:02:42 PM by Pow » »

 

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